Thursday, August 05, 2004

Men In Black



Quote of the day: "I just want this day to end."

108 comments:

exfbonnie said...

Holy Sh*t, CB...oh my God. I dont know what to say. oh my God.

American Soldier said...

Another day, another dollar, .99 cents to Uncle Sam and the rest to momma! Give them hell my friend, I will be 'boots on ground' soon enough.

You PLT Sgt, was he wearing the old style Kevlar or the new shit?

American Soldier

Pawatwoop said...

Good work trooper, good to here you are ok. If you are ever in Winston-Salem, NC... Look me up and I'll buy you a keg.

ALa said...

CB -I second Bonnie...I have no idea what to say -except thank God you are OK. My family prays for you every night (as I am sure that MANY people on this site do)...Thank you once again Our Soldier!

Sgt.Loco said...

Holy Shit!...GET SOME!...that sounded crazy. I heard about that external ammunition....who was the rocket scientist that designed that? To bad he wasn't there to reload that .50!

Stay sharp and be safe...

91ghost said...

I think I'll take your version over CNN's...there really are no words that could adequately articulate the sacrifice you and all of your battalion mates are making...you know Tom Brokaw calls the World War II generation the "Greatest Generation." I have to respectfully disagree. During World War II there was a much different national mind set and body of ethics and values---just about everybody was behind the war and was willing to go...today, in this society, where hordes of young men in their early to late twenties still have the mannerisms, maturity, and values of a sixteen year old, and the most important thing to them is perhaps the latest X box game or what tattoo to get...well, today it is a polarized society that is over-saturated with greed and laziness...today's soldier stands head and shoulders above his/her peers back home...the "Greatest Generation" is today's soldier...the prayers flow strong for you CB

Carla said...

Wow. Just...wow. Stay strong, stay safe.

tropical said...
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justrose said...

Oh God, oh God. I was worried about you all day yesterday. And today I said, "I'm sure what they said on the news was only the tip of the iceberg in Mosul yesterday because he didn't post." I am so glad you are all right. God be with you.

Nicole said...

Amazing... My god, my heart was pounding the entire time. What an adrenaline rush just reading that. So so glad that you are ok! I know that the media doesn't tell things how it really is, and I am so glad that you are doing this so we know what the real deal is!
Stay Safe!

Bathus said...

This morning I recevied this note from a friend and am passing it along:

"From: dan
To: addressremoved.com
Sent: Thursday, August 05, 2004 7:33 AM
Subject: Prayers for a fine young man


Please keep in your prayers a fine young Army officer named Damon Armeni. His mom is in my online support group for families of injured Marine recruits. Both Damon and his Marine brother Bryce are in Iraq. Sharon wrote us this morning to tell us that Damon was one of the casualties in the fighting in Mosul yesterday. His vehicle was hit by an RPG and he received severe injuries to his chest and intestines. He had several ribs removed at the field hospital and they are evacuating him to Germany to do more surgeries. He is in critical but stable condition. Sharon and the young man's wife are being flown to Germany to be with him. Needless to say she is extremely upset after getting the second worse phone call you can get from the military. Keep them in your prayers....

Dan

RTO Trainer said...

I don't know what kind of hit count you get each day, bud, but I'm going to link this one special. People, just regular folks, need to know about this.

I'm in Afgnanistan, have been nine months and haven't been shot at nor fired a shot. I just hope that if I have to, I perform as well as you did.

God Bless.

Mako said...

Was it anything like Black Hawk Down?

Brandon said...

10 second burst? ha. I think you are stretching the definition of a 'burst'. Regardless, damn good job! Just in case anyone is interested...

Here is where he was operating the 50 cal from:
http://tinyurl.com/4yux5

Here a a picture of the interior of the Stryker - the gunner sits on the right and the OIC sits on the left. The interface in front of the OIC allows him to communicate with other srtykers (text and voice) - they share a common map which shows the position of friendly units, and allows them to mark the position of enemy targets etc.
http://tinyurl.com/6rzyk

Here are the hatches he is talking about:
http://tinyurl.com/6lkfa

Zosocrowe said...

OMG! Thank God you're okay! And thank you for your reports of what really goes on over there. It brings things into perspective. Be safe, stay strong!

Russell said...

Godspeed my friend. Our prayers are with you!!

tropical said...

cb we are all so glad you are safe!!! you know i read about this mosul event in the washington post, ny times & ap and NONE of them mentioned ANY american casualties, NONE. but you speak of at least 2 casualties one serious with the stomach wound. it makes you wonder if we back in america are getting the full story. as you say this time it was different, no hit and run more like a full scale battle. then also yesterday one of our helicopters got downed in najav when they attacked a police station. also i'm reading that turkish truck drivers are refusing to resupply americans because of the beheading and that supply route the northern one was supposed to be the safest 1 of 3 into the country. i wonder if the tempo is picking up. hope this isn't leading to some kind of full scale all out move. cb i know its very little but we all care about you. there are millions of thoughts and prayer vibes coming your way!!!! we love you!! tropical

Charlie said...

CB,
In two deployments to SWA, nothing I've seen holds a candle to what you just described. Sounds like you guys gave them hell, though. Be proud of how you and your comrades handled yourselves, no one could have done it better.

Pat in NC said...

Your account is riveting and I am so thankful you are okay. I do hope those casualties are able to survive their injuries with proper medical care. Our troops are in my prayers.

this we'll defend said...

Good job troop, I'm proud of you.

I also don't think I'm a combat veteran at all. Damn.

mairy said...

I'm still shaking! I can't believe those idiots-in-black won't give up! God bless you, CB. I look forward to your post every day, because your descriptions are so great, and because it tells us you're still kicking! Sending tons of prayers/positive vibrations your way. Mary A.

Kat said...

CB...crap! I mean, that was so intense. Thank God you are ok and the men with you. We'll say a prayer for the boy that was hit and one for you. Stay safe dammit!

MickeyMe said...

Thank God I can exhale again! I saw those headlines about Mosul, went straight to your blog site -- knowing the last thing you had time for was talking to us -- and when you weren't here, well, I was worried. You're the smartest, the greatest, and I went into "if they lay a hand on my boy they'll have to deal with me" mode. I found all kinds of news about Kobe Bryant's case, but nada about what's new in Mosul.

Trust us all, you are not alone. None of you are alone. We send you good, positive energy. During WWII we heard the phrase, "There are no aethiests in a fox hole." Well, now when I read your posts, I know there are no aethiests in a Stryker.

Peter V said...
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cpumaster said...

Hi, I've been reading your blog for awhile now, it is an excellent substitute for most fo the news that's been filtered that coming out of iraq, I think. And I am very glad that you're safe (I've to admit part of it is for my own selfish interest).
Most news sites updated the casualty to 22 dead today,
no mention of any US casualties nor injured soldiers.
I pray that you and the rest of the soldiers there are safe. I hope the situation there don't turn into another Falluja or (less heard about) Ramadi. I know it sound pessimistic, but... hopefully this is the last desperate attempt by a few stubborn Iraqis (or foreign fighters, whatever), not the beginning of something big.

I have a question, how come an RPG got through the Stryker and hit one of the soldier? Is it kind like a 'lucky shot' through an opening (ie the hatch) or does it went through the armor?
Anyway, thanks for your sacrifice, stay safe, don't take unnecessary risk and keep it low.

barkeep said...

longtime reader, first time poster.
Calvin from the Calvin and Hobbes cartoons once said about the news "This isn't informative, this is a sound bite! this is sensationalism! this is entertainment." Thank you for helping clarify just how much gets swept under the rug by the fools behind my TV screen.
Also, from what you tell us about your ASVAB score, your fellow soldiers don't have the skill to tell their stories as well as you do, so I hope you keep them well informed of all the support the comments on your Blog represent. And just so the big media does not have everyone convinced that it's 100% death and turmoil in iraq, here is a good article about all the progress that Hard working Iraqis and good-hearted foreigners have made.

http://chrenkoff.blogspot.com/2004/08/good-news-from-iraq-part-7.html

that should shut up any who would say all your hard work and sacrifices are in vain.

Sarah said...
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Pawatwoop said...

Below is an explanation of how an RPG and or other anti vehicle weapons work. It’s from a technical and or clinical point of view, so I’d like to apologize in advance. In no way shape or form am I trying to lessen the seriousness of what happened to that soldier or to lessen the humanity of it all when I hear one of my fellow troops has been wounded or killed.

The RPG could have been a lucky shot through an open hatch, but in that confined amount of space it would have killed all involved when it detonated.

The RPG is a shaped charge meant to “Smash” though armor. It’s not so much the round itself that directly causes internal damage to a vehicle, but actually the force it transfers through the armor of the vehicle to the interior. Most likely what hit the soldier was shrapnel from the inside lining of the Stryker. (The while part you see in the photos above.) A penetrating round would produce flaking and some molten medal that then harms the crew or sets of secondary explosions through stored ammunition or fuel. That in turn is what causes a vehicle to burn and explode.

Lastly, another reader asked why ammunition is stored on the outside of the vehicle instead of inside. One possible reason is due to the inherent lack of space within the vehicle once you pack in the 11+ man crew, their gear, weapons, personal ammo and other effects. Also, the less amount of burnable material inside the vehicle, the less chance a penetrating round will cause the vehicle to cook off in the event of a penetrating hit.

Sorry for the long post, and best of luck to you CB, the offer for the keg stands.

nochizmo said...

And I sell fucking copiers, if I wasn't too old to join up I'd be on my way there. I hate the fact that I cannot be there with you guys, but I think about you each and every day.

The papers say 22 dead now, but I think you might have hit 22 on your own from that info you gave us. Keep it up, we are REALLY PROUD of you guys!

Vadergrrrl said...

Stay safe.

We love you.

xxxooooooo

Sonofhades said...

Well, the news seem to report that those 12 were civilians that got killed in the crossfire or so. If the insurgents managed to drag their bodies away after such show of force...

bopperholly said...

Wow, thank you for that, refreshing to hear the truth. I just want to let you know how much you and all your men and women are appreciated and prayed for everyday, you stepped up when others stepped down, you are a true hero, I cant say thank you enough.

David said...

Ya done good.

Peter V said...

I apologize for the inappropriateness of my previous post.

An incredible story. You and your fellow soldiers exhibit the ultimate quality of humanity; selflessness. The willingness to go back in a raging battle shows extradinary courage and character.

I'm honored to read our exploits.

Stay safe. We pray for you and your fellow soliders.

Stevus said...

Dudes, I am so grateful for your actions and sacrifices. You are the american i wish there were more of. I have a brother in Baghdad in Army 1 Cav. One more thing, just remember what were fighting for. Were fighting for naked chicks, beer, football, and TGIF night. Theyre fighting for women you cant see because theyre so covered up you dont know if its a dude getting ready to do battle or a woman, the right not to drink, eat certain foods and drinks, sports they cant play because it promotes separatism, and no freakin scientific frontiers because all of these countries are so deep in shit from problems they brought on themselves. Keep up the good work, were all proud of you back at home.

nygal said...

I just knew something was up when I didn't see a post from you early this morning! Am thankful you are OK. Was that PVT on the mission with you from your earlier post? I can't imagine how he could've coped with all that. Keep your wits about you - and we all pray for you and your fellow soldiers.

uzombie said...

My boss refers to CNN as Communist News Network. So don't let their distortion get to ya.
And, all the folks I work with stand behind our troops, whenever and wherever they are deployed. My colleague also has a son that is being deployed to Iraq (Pfc B. Jones).
Good luck and keep your 7.62mm's & 9mm's clean! (and the .50 cal too!)

Desultory Girl said...

CB, Holy Sh*t. I'm speechless, aside from I'm glad your safe. I'm praying for you.

artbyruth said...

CB- I am exhausted just from reading your post!!! God is definitely with you. Keep up the GREAT WORK!! You guys are the BEST America has to offer.

Makes me pray even harder for you guys. Wish there was more I could do and say.

Brandon- those photos did help! Thanks for the URLS. Now I can visualize CB's Strykers and everything. (I am a visual learner..)

perezidential said...

Wow. Stay Safe man. My opinion on Strykers have changed through your blog. I don't even want to think what would have happened if your were in Hummers.

Bellicose Woman said...

Glad you are alive and well. Good job. I just hope someone did give that Iraqi interpreter a weapon. And I hope he got a few himself.

~Jen~ said...

I was scared to death that you were involved in that fight, but I had no idea....my god. Oh my god.

firstbrokenangel said...

OMG -wow! Love the comments, made me cry.

vrangel said...

Great job. Combat infantry ownz the enemy.

But pathetic state of our intelligence (both iraqi and american ) makes me angry. Coordinated offensive involving hundreds of insurgents, pretty well organized (they even had sort of uniforms to see their own) and no advance warning whatsoever !

Intelligence keeps failing again and again , WMD my ass.

Cyko said...

Sounds like you guys were taking in some hellfire. Glad you made it out of there okay and I am sorry for the other guy that got hurt. I hope he is okay now. Our prayers are with you and all other enlisted men. Come home safe!

Tom Kessler said...

This was quite a story, my friend. I've never heard a story of war quite so vividly told by an involved party so close to the time of the battle. It's truly awe-inspiring to imagine what you faced, and the bravery with which you and your fellow soldiers faced it.

I know that what you are doing is important and necessary, and that someday history will look upon you and your fellows as heroes the likes of which some parts of America believed we could no longer produce. But I feel a pang when I read stories such as yours, as one who supported the war from the beginning, and still supports it today. It's the pang of responsibility for every risk you must take, every scene of violence you must witness, and every life you must end. And at this moment, that pang exceeds any sense of the value of the work you are doing in Iraq, protecting our nation by putting yourself in harm's way.

But more even than that pang, I feel a sense of admiration and gratitude toward you that I can't hope to express. Your courage and self-sacrifice is what keeps America safe, and allows all of us to enjoy the freedoms we so cherish. May you be safe under fire, and remain strong in your heart for as long as your strength is needed. And may America never forget the sacrifices you have made on her behalf.

rabbit said...

cb -
I was terrified reading this and holding my breath that everyone (the good guys anyway) would come out alive.
I do have a question, though, and hope it doesn't offend. I don't understand why you weren't able to kill more bad guys/militants/terrorists. I know you said CNN underestimated with just twelve. But reading your description of this operation and considering that there appeared to be hundreds of these men in black and that this battle went on for many hours, I was expecting (and hoping) that there would be at least 80 dead terrorists. Of course, I write this as an armchair civilian who has never held a gun. My cousin, who is British and was in the RAF, thinks the US army is poorly trained and they lack sophistication when it comes to weapon use. Basically, he says Americans just barge in and shoot around blindly missing most of their targets and usually end up killing innocent civilians or shooting themselves. (he says Americans are the worst when it comes to friendly fire and the Brits don't like to work with them because of it). I'm not trying to get you riled up. I told my cousin he was full of shit and didn't know what he was talking about (but the truth is he's the one with a military background, not me). Anyway, I showed him your post today (mainly to show how intense things were over there) and he says it's more evidence of the lack of skill of the american soldiers ( he thinks you should have been able to completely wipe out the opposition) I argued with him, but to be honest, I don't understand why our troops didn't inflict more casualties.
Please help me straighten my cousin out.
Thanks for this fantastic site. I'm addicted to it and I pray each night for your safety.

joney said...

I am ex Army and feel bad all the time that I did not go back in for this. I am a single Mom and after reading that I do not know if I am still sad I am not back in or happy as hell. Thank you,
Heather

perezidential said...

cbftw,

Your site is linked in a post about the armed conflict in Mosul on Prof. Juan Cole's blog, Informed Comment at www.juancole.com Prof. Cole's site gets major traffic. I expect you'll be getting an even bigger audience from now on.

vrangel said...

Just lifted this from BBC frontpage:

"The BBC's Peter Greste says it is the first time Iraqi forces have fought insurgents without coalition support."

Sigh...

alix said...

oh jesus CB...i'm so glad you and your buds are ok...will be thinking heavily about the injured.

i was waking up several times last night, and you mosul fellas were my first thought. "gotta pray for those men" jesus. i had no fucking idea.

man, i just wanna hug the hell out of all of you. when did ya change brass balls to titanium? good damn job.

this we'll defend said...

Rabbit: your RAF friend is of course misinformed. The US Army is the best trained force in the history of the world. However, to be honest, not all units meet the same standard. For instance, any regular army soldier (and honest national guardsman) will tell you that a national guard unit won't have the same proficiency or discipline as a regular Army unit. How could they given that the regular unit trains 250 more days a year with more resources? That they are proficient at all shows how great Army training is, and also how dedicated the civilian/soldiers in the reserves are to our nation. Still, there is a huge difference in skill levels between the NG and the Regular Army.

Perhaps your friend's experience comes from a British unit that trained with a US reserve unit, and he didn't see what he expected to see.

I've worked with the Brits - 2nd Para, Royal Marines, and KOSBs (King's Own Scottish Borderers). They are very good. But compare 2nd Para to a Territorial unit and you will see what I am talking about.

Only the US Military has resources like the National Training Center and Joint Readiness Training Center where full-fledged force-on-force training takes place. Because of these combat training centers the US Army is a more effective fighting force than any in the world and anybody that is convinced otherwise is engaging in nationalistic wishful thinking.

The difference in training is critical. For instance, the Royal Marines have a much-respected 3-day testing period in which they claim to eliminate 99.9% of applicants. That is great, but it doesn't mean that at the end of their training pipeline they have better, more highly skilled, more physically fit warriors. It means they elminated those that weren't in awesome physical condition to begin with. The US Army and Marine Corps will take kids that in no way could have made it into the Royal Marines, but a year later they are phsyically fit, well-trained, disciplined warriors as good as the planet has ever seen. And their fire discipline is incredible to see in action.

So I won't downplay the British Army or Royal Marine's great combat effectiveness. However, I think anybody that feels a British rifle company is better than a US rifle company should immediately be put into a rehab program for his obviously very serious drug problem.

As for why more "bad guys" weren't dead, that is a question only the inexperienced ask and you admit to it so I won't shred you.

A simple way to explain it is this: had the insurgents (I won't call them terrorists because it appears they wore uniforms to distinguish themselves from non-combatants) fought like a regular army they would have all been killed defending terrain. They are instead (wisely) fighting as insurgents so they don't put themselves in a position where they can be overrun. They learned this from the few survivors who made it out alive from Iraqi military units that tried to stand up to the "poorly-trained" US Army during the invasion. Stand up to the Army and fight a conventional battle and you will die. They instead shoot and scoot, fire from rooftops and down alleyways, never remaining in the same spot and moving around constantly. They fire blindly, probably putting their AKs around a wall and blasting while not even looking. They pop up and fire RPGs and then duck down so fast that this is why most of them miss - but also why they don't get hit by return fire.

When insurgents don't use the cover of buildings properly, as these bad guys appear to have done, they will suffer much larger casualties. Look at the battle of Mogadishu for an example of what happens when irregular fighters try and fight instead of shoot-and-scoot. Hundreds of Somali fighters dead, hundreds of civilians, and 18 US dead.

If the soldiers were more concerned about killing the enemy than they were with hitting only combatants they would have done what your friend suggests - killed a lot more bad guys, but a lot more civilians too. Most of the Somali civilian casualties were caused by Somali militiamen. Most of the Iraqi civilian casualties were caused by Iraqi insurgents. US soldiers have good fire discipline, so insurgents take advantage of that.

Finally, you often fire not at a particular target but to provide cover fire (suppressive fire) just to keep the enemy's head down while you manuever. You expend a lot of "unaimed" shots - but you make sure they aren't aimed at places civilians might be or at friendly troops. Thus it is entirely possible to empty a .50 cal without hitting a single enemy fighter - it is important to remember that by doing so he didn't hit you either.

phoxxy said...

My husband was over there last year. Got home in November. He's getting activated within the month and will be heading back over. First go in Iraq he went in at the start of the war and left in November. He left before things started going downhill, in my opinion. And I dread him going back.

Out of everyone in his unit that will be going he is the only one that has been deployed before. (He is in the National Guard.) This will be his third wartime deployment. He was deployed to Saudi during the Gulf War in the early 90's and to Kuwait/Iraq between Jan-Nov for the war in Iraq. I have faith enough to know that he has a good head on his shoulders and is a good soldier, but I have no delusions of what he will probably face when he returns to Iraq. I only pray he makes it through in one piece and maybe provides the wisdom he has learned to help a few of his fellow soldiers home as well.

It is refreshing to hear what it really is like. My brother-in-law who was with the 3rd ID and first into Baghdad said..."80% of what you hear is bullshit on the news." Fluffed up crap or not reporting the facts at all. I think if people knew half of what soldiers face over there, they'd realize that the greater threat and problem we are all dealing with. Then again, some political asswipe or media mogel will find some way to bend and twist to truth only to have it service their needs.

Anyway, hang in there. Just remember that are people here back home who appreciate all you are doing. Even if there seems like there's no clear light leading you out of the sandbox.

rabbit said...

This We'll Defend-
thanks for the explanation. You have given me some excellent arguing points for the next time I see my obnoxious cousin :)

phoxxy said...

This We'll Defend-

You said: or instance, any regular army soldier (and honest national guardsman) will tell you that a National Guard unit won't have the same proficiency or discipline as a regular Army unit.

Actually, I have to disagree to an extent. The National Guard Battalion that my husband went over to Iraq with entered Iraq on the 2nd day of the war was quite proficient and disciplined. Don't sell the boys short. The roll of the National Guard has changed drastically within the last 5 years at least. Many are on deployment rotations and have been for some time. If the military didn't think these guys were battle ready they surely wouldn't have placed a Guard Battalion in the thick of it all. That being said, the battalion my husband was deployed with had only one casualty the whole deployment. decent for a BAT that can say they earned a CIB and engaged the enemy.

You would be heavily surprised at the amount of training that National Guard does participate in. You have your Enhance Infantry Brigades, which are federally funded and have more enhanced training. Then there are your standard Guard units. They rely on State funds and generally don't receive the more advanced training, but again, a lot has changed in the last few years or so. Also, there has been push for school and such through the Guard. Many soldiers aren’t resigning themselves to just the one weekend a month and two weeks out of the year but are signing up for training schools to help enhance their readiness.

I will also say that our State has a good majority of its troops deployed overseas: Bosnia, Afghanistan and Iraq. The units deployed are playing and important roll overseas just as much as the active guys.

I won't say every Guard unit is battle ready or equal in comparison to active Army, but you are making a general assumptions that the National Guard cannot meet battle demands due to lack of training. Don’t sell them short. Lord knows I wouldn’t.

Sara said...

CB-I was also worried yesterday when you didn't post, and then when I read what you posted today I didn't feel much better. Every single person here was thinking about you and your boys--and all of us read with bated breath. Along with telling you how glad I am that everyone is okay, I was thinking about what you said about being scared to death (which I think would be a given in a situation like the one you all faced). That new guy you posted about--the one who was all nervous, and you didn't know what to say to him because it wouldn't sound all Hollywood--CB, telling him about how you felt, the thoughts that were running through your head, these are the things that you can share with him, and it won't come off as BS, AND you won't be babysitting him or holding his hand. You had a chance to talk yourself down with your buddy when all was said and done, and really that's all he needs too. It's odd, but I think when we are scared, sometimes the most comforting thing to hear is that someone else is scared too, just so we know that we aren't alone. Anyway, all of you are in my prayers. I can't even explain how much I feel for you guys and I don't even know you.

phoxxy said...

Amen, Sara! I totally agree. Sometimes it helps to be scared together. Or depressed together. I know one of the important things I stressed when I headed up our Military Family Support Group is that you really can't do it alone. The only way you will make it through your loved one being gone is to share how you feel with others, because when it comes down to it, everyone is feeling the same thing. Sometimes hearing that it is okay to feel the way you do and that someone else is feeling the same thing can take a great weight off your shoulders. I can imagine it would be the same thing out in the field.

And I'm right with you in prayers. I know a lot of us are praying for the guys over there. I know I appreciate every stranger and friend who has prayed for my husband.

Beth said...

Every day I pray to St. Anthony and Christopher for all of you guys. I hope my son is with a person that is as aware of their surroundings as you are if he gets sent over there.
I am also praying for the "new guy" that you wrote about.

Garret said...

Dude, I am *so* sorry you guys had to go through that. I am glad to hear you made out okay, though. I hope things calm down a bit so you can recover. Thanks for keeping us posted.

sarah said...

holy shit man - thats all i have to say

strykeraunt said...

Okay, I am really tense right now so please bear with me. The mass media and releases from the military reported on the activities in Mosul yesterday are absolutely deplorable!! When I was reading the articles from various news sources last night I had a feeling that there was something missing. Frankly, I could not imagine that all hell broke loose in Mosul and there was no American military presence!!

This morning I came to this site to see if CB reported out on the activities and low and behold, there it is, a comparison between what the media is reporting and what really happened. Thank you CB for telling us the truth!! Next, I visit a site that posts news regarding the Stryker Bridage (they don't write any news themselves just put the stuff in one location in order to provide a service for those who follow the strykers). On this site is a news release from Task Force Olympia and again same misinformation that is reported by the media outlets!! What is the deal here...I expect this from the CNN, etc. but Taskforce Olympia and the rest of the Military sources need to be providing accurate information. (this is the second time that I have suspected TFO of providing misleading information). By not mentioning that our guys were involved is a serious mis-justice to our fine men and women who are making such a tremendous sacrifice for us. They do not deserve this mistreatment. I don't care if this is election season or not...they need to be provide accurate information. This is very serious if they are doing this for political reasons. By only reporting that the ING was involved in the firefight they are withholding crucial information, that slanted the story and (in my mind) attempted to mislead the public at the expense of the soldier. Images of Bagdad Bob were in my mind today. Where is that guy right now??

Please!! If you respond to my post, I am really NOT looking for a Bush vs. Kerry type of response...I would like to know why every official source appears to be lying right now. I really want and need to believe that there is not an intentional attempt to deceive.

drdamned said...

Damn. You're a hero here back home. My thoughts are with you guys every day. If you're ever, ever in the Philadelphia area, email me. I'll buy you beer to quench your thirst, give you a bed in my house to rest your head, and breakfast in the morning. My father was in Korea - MIA for 3 months while walking to the 38th after being shot down 300 miles north of it.

No matter the politics of how you got there, just get home safe.

Mike O said...

Downright frightening. Those lunatics are just plain nuts! Glad you guy only seem to take one casualty; with that much output from your end, I'm sure you guys smoked scores; buried in back holes not to let you guys know what a bloddy nose you gave them.
My deepest appreciation for your service and your blog. Beer waits for you in the Dallas area as well.

Phoenix_Blogger said...

CB - First time reader...Came here from Iraqthemodel.com
Thanks for sharing your experiences...I'm floored...Stay safe and God Bless!

Jason -- USA said...

i just started breathing again after reading your post.

you guys did awesome.

i pray that God Almighty keeps you safe.

TTboyArDee said...

Found this on Portal of Evil News. HOpe you don't mind, but i like you on my Blog. All i can say is, 'Dude!'

this we'll defend said...

hooahmomma (great handle): I appreciate you coming to the defense of our reserves and national guard.

However, I don't think it was needed. They are great (GREAT) but I never said they weren't. I said only that they aren't as proficient and disciplined as regular army units, and they shouldn't be expected to be that way. Most guard and reserve units meet ALL the requirements the Army sets out for them, and those standards are the same for them as for the active-duty folks. Whether it is CTT training, or METL tasks, or whatever, most guard and reserve units do just fine.

What I meant is that they aren't as proficient and disciplined as the Regular Army. There is a huge difference in skill levels. That isn't because reservists and national guard soldiers aren't good soldiers - many are prior service active duty folks anyway, and I myself was a proud reservist in special operations command and my unit met the same standards as all SOC units are required to meet.

But, barring activation, reserve units drill for 2 days a month and 2 weeks a year. That is 35 days a year, spread out over 12 months. A Regular Army rifle company by comparison will train 280 days a year. To expect reserve and NG units to be as proficient and disciplined in 30 non-consecutive days as another unit that is given 280 days is to expect the impossible.

So NG and Reserve units are great, but they aren't the same - not "less," just "reserve." They aren't expected to be the varsity, at least not without time for a train-up, and the fact that so many are serving extended active-duty tours and doing so well is more than expected and to their everlasting credit - and it pisses me off because you don't use your reserves unless you need them. To depend on them for an extended period of time, treating them like active-duty folks, is to not have a reserve force at all but a larger active-duty force. But that is another topic altogether.

There are some reserve units that are at least as skilled as their active-duty counterparts. That is because their civilian jobs and their military jobs are the same. Activate a medical reserve unit and it is no surprise that the doctors, nurses, etc. all do the same job in civilian life and usually have more experience than their active duty counterparts. Call up a JAG unit and they are all lawyers. Air Guard units call up pilots that have as many or in most cases more flight hours than the regular AF, and most of the pilots were prior active service. They do just fine.

These are always the units that are used to show how ready the reserves are. They make up a small percentage of the reserves. The reservists I'm worried about are those with no civilian counterpart - a NG infantry unit for example. We aren't treating them fairly.

To claim, as the official policy dictates, that reservists are just as ready, able, and proficient as the active-duty folks results in untrained units being called on to do what they were never trained to do. And it is happening. The MPs at Abu Ghraib were reservists, and had they been more disciplined and their leaders more diligent we wouldn't have had that scandal. I know reservists are going to go ballistic when I say this, but had that unit been an active-duty unit the scandal would not have happened.

To claim that all reservists are unready and don't contribute to the war is just as false of course - perhaps more so, because some units are doing amazing things. But we should not expect a unit that trains for 30 days (plus, I must acknowledge, countless hours of unpaid and volunteered time by members of the chain of command of each and every reserve unit out there) to be the same as another unit with 280 days, even if both are given all of the same resources other than time. 30 is less than 280 and it is that simple. That is why we should carefully use our reserves, calling them up only in times of national emergency, and giving them the time to train-up that we gave the active-duty folks. We should be treating them like members of the same team.

Instead we give them less time to prepare; when they are called up their dependents aren't given the same privileges as active-duty folks; pay problems are inexcusable but amazingly commonplace; we put them into a combat situation with at most 30 days to get ready for it - and they still do ok. But we shouldn't be doing it. It isn't fair to them. And it isn't an insult to the reservists for an old regular army guy like me to say so.

If we want them to be as prepared we should give them 280 days of training a year. Of course we don't because then they wouldn't be reservists but active duty. The plan was to give most reserve units six months - 180 days - before deployment, and we aren't even giving them that. And the official policy has convinced most reservists that any time a regular Army officer talks about the subject of readiness they are prejudiced against the guard and don't like them. I question what is going on because I love them. I would raise hell in a handbasket if I were told I only had 30 days to train my guys, but by the way they need to be as ready and will be given the same missions as another unit given 280 days.

At the NTC we have a reserve rotation about once every 12 - 18 months. A NG unit is called up for an extended AT (summer camp - the AT stands for annual training) and they deploy on out to Irwin to face the vaunted OPFOR. I've been involved in the train-ups for several of those NG rotations. The NG units always meet all of the requirements - they have great gunnery skills, they meet PT standards, have all their equipment, everybody is MOS qualified and passes CTT training, etc. Their leadership is always convinced that they are combat ready. They even point out when they have higher gunnery skills than an active duty unit. They never seem to understand that if a squad of soliders all qualify expert on the M16 range it doesn't mean they can shoot, move, and communicate effectively on the battlefield. But we let it go, because how can you train somebody that doesn't even know that they don't know? How do you even start?

So they roll into the box and it is ALWAYS the easiest 2 weeks the OPFOR has all year long. We fight them with half our usual regimental strength. We hold off on hitting them with everything at once but attack piecemeal. The Chief of Operations Group takes even more assets away from the OPFOR, ones that would be used against a Regular Army brigade in an instant. We allow their scout teams to penetrate even after we have spotted their push. That isn't because we are taking it "easy on them" but because otherwise they would lose so fast that they wouldn't get the desired training effect from the mission. All they would know is that they crossed into the box, suddenly OPFOR was everywhere, and then they were dead and the after-action review was starting. Instead they get near their objective, after making contact against OPFOR units here and there (they always think it is the regimental main body but it is usally more like a motorized rifle platoon) and then we hit them and wipe them out (even though they still outnumber us). And always we are told by our regular Army bosses never never never to say anything bad about the reserves even though that was the weakest BLUFOR we fought in 18 months. So we don't. And we shouldn't, even though they were so easy to beat. I'll tell you why:

Most NG units are incredibly "ate-up" the first mission. For instance, they take hours to uncoil out of their assembly areas. They get lost, lose equipment, suffer injuries because somebody was doing something stupid. They can't get their radios to work in the secure "green" mode but go into the red so that we listen to all they are saying. Instead of rolling out in a team "diamond" formation they roll out one vehicle behind the other as if on the 101 freeway. Worse than any Regular unit ever. All the guns pointed straight ahead instead of scanning their sectors. But... five missions later and they always ALWAYS have improved more than any Regular unit we train out in that hard desert. Sure, they have a lot further to go because they had so much to learn, but most of the problems they encounter aren't due to a lack of motivation or a lack of ability, but simply a lack of training time. Uncoiling 800 armored vehicles from an assembly area isn't easy the first time, but if your unit has done it 20 times the 21st time at the NTC isn't a problem. No NG unit has ever uncoiled before coming to the NTC because they wouldn't have had the opportunity. Yet by the last mission they are uncoiling and ready to roll in minutes just like the Regular units that do it on a monthly basis. Gunners are scanning. They are employing the proper formation. We can't listen in anymore because they are in the "green." They aren't getting lost. They aren't all shooting at the same target when they make contact but are cross-talking and designating targets, ensuring more of the OPFOR is getting hit instead of just one BMP while 20 other OPFOR vehicles rush them with impunity. By the end of the rotation they aren't as good as the worst of the Regular units but they also just spent only 3 weeks instead of 12 months in hard training. A reserve unit given a six-month train-up could be the equal of a regular unit - and that is an amazing, stunning thing to say. After all, it took that regular unit 18 months.

I don't look down on the reserves, I look up to them. Ask a regular infantryman to be a part time accountant, Fedex delivery guy, website designer, carpenter, or whatever and see how good they do at those tasks. The regular guys wouldn't know where to start. Reservists do their civilian jobs AND are proficient soldiers.

Reservists are twice the citizen, we owe them a great deal, and I respect the hell out of them. But they aren't as proficient as the Regular guys because they do it part-time. No shame or insult in that at all. It is just a fact.

vic said...

NOT 1ST TIME READER,BUT 1ST TIME RESONPSE,AND1ST I WOULD LOVE TO SAY,THANK YOU SON,AND THE VERY WELL OF YOUR BEING,AND BLESSED THAT YOU MADE IT BACK......
YOU HAVE HAD ME WONDERING IN THE PAST MONTH IF:IS HE REALLY REAL? OR ONE HELL'OFA WRITER...
AND WHAT THE FUCK IS UP WITH NO BACK UP SURPORT???COIULD'NT GET NO BIRDS IN THE AIR,OR WHAT?HELL THERE WAS MUCH MORE TALK ABOUT NAJAF THAT DAY...REALLY PROUD FOR WHAT YOUR DOING 4 YOUR COUNTRY...
HATE TO ASK,BUT COULD YOU DO US ALL A HUGE FAVOR AND IF SOMETHING BY CHANCE HAPPENS TO YOU,COULD YA HAVE A BUD GET ON AND LET US KNOW PLEASE? SURE WOULD APPERCIATE IT HONEY,CAN'T HELP IT I'M A MOMMA WHAT CAN I SAY,MY LITTLE GIRL IS IN BAGHDAD,AND IN A Q.R.F.PROUD YES,DO I LIKE IT NO,DON'T BELIVE IN WARS UNLESS CONCRETE FACTS,BELIVE IN MISSIONS WHEN NECESSARY,DON'T BELIVE IN THE GOVERMENT LYING TO HIGH SCHOOL KIDS.(I KNOW I SAT THERE WITH HER)I DO SUPPORT OUR TROOPS 100%.I AM A AMERICAN...HAD 3 BROTHERS IN NAM...AND NO I'M NOT A FUCK'IN TRADER...SO YOU STAY SAFE AND SANE MY BLOGGER BOY. MAY GOD'S ANGEL'S FLY OVER YOU......

phoxxy said...

this we'll defend --

Very great response on your part to point out the differences. My post, however, wasn't meant to challenge and dispute entirely what you have said. As you stated, a NG unit that has been through the whole deployment process before is more likely to have their junk together than an NG unit with no deployment experience. The point that I was trying to make, I guess, is that many don't realize that the role of the NG has changed drastically and many still do not see the NG in the same light -- in some of the more critical aspects -- as active duty units.

For instance, when my husband was activated for Operating Enduring Freedom, November of 2002, my mom was in total disbelief. She'd tell me, "Honey, he's just going to be guarding some airport somewhere." Then, when both my husband and myself tried to explain to her it would be overseas in Kuwait and that was this very real her response was, "Can't he get out of it? After all it is only the National Guard they don't do anything important anyway." This! Coming from my own mother. Even when it came down to zero hour for the invasaion into Iraq, she kept telling me, "His unit won't set foot in Iraq."

My husband's unit was a litmus test to see if NG units could handle combat theater operations. They were the first NG battalion since the Korean conflict to be activated and the first time at the Battalion level since that time for an NG unit to receive a CIB. They went in on the second day of the war and provided security and mop up on the tails of the 3rd ID and the marines as they left An Nasiriyah. They did missions up further north around Baghdad and can remember a vivid letter home from my husband from an engagement they had that May where he said it was a long night and after it was done the most he remembered (or cared to remember from it) was the tracer fire.

Anyway, his unit did so well, suffering only one casualty death during the deployment. That it really, I think, opened the door up for many other NG deployments. Many people don't realize that we had NG on the ground during the invasion into Iraq. I guess the lasting piece of history that I have for proof is the 48 hours tape that shows them going up Ambush Alley.

I just want people to not have any misconceptions about what the NG and Reserve component does and their role in global operations. Many people still have this vision of a weekend warrior and, admist all the mud slinging of war dodging in the political theater, see it as a way to get out of putting themselves in harms way. After all, I had a Vietnam vet tell me, "If they really wanted to be fighting, they would have enlisted in the active army."

BTW, thanks on the name kudos. Not my normal handle, but use it when I game online with my husband. :)

opforsoldier said...

Keep up the good work! We are keeping you and your buddies in our thoughts and prayers. As a former grunt I especially pray for your guys safe return.

Infantryman's Prayer

Almighty God, whose will it is that we be leaders of men.

Hear us as we come to you for guidance in this awesome
responsibility.

Let us never forget our duty in the men whom lead. May we instill in them the qualities of loyalty, integrity and duty.

Grant us the patience in dealing with the mistakes of our fellow man.

Let us never forget that no man is perfect, but that perfection for fragile humans is trying each day to be better than the day before.

Give us courage, O Lord, in the face of danger; keep us pure in heart, clean in mind, and strong in purpose.

Remind us that wisdom is not gained in an hour, a day, or in a year, but it is a process that continues all the days of our lives.

Keep ever before us our goal, which is not to perpetrate war, but to safeguard peace and preserve your great gift to man, Freedom.

May you always be near to guide us in decisions, comfort us in our failures, and keep us humble in our successes. We ask your divine blessings and leadership as we discharge the honor and responsibility of leading men in the service of our country.

Walk close to us always, our father that we may not fall.


AMEN

Blog Guy said...

Damn. Not sure what else to say. Damn.

Gonna link you from my blog and start telling people about you. Thanks for all you're doing. You are appreciated more than you know.

Jenny said...

I want to leave a comment but your post has left me speachless.

Please know you all are in my heart and prayers. You make America proud. Thank you.

Mike SC USA said...

Here the latest and you guys did better than you thought: 300 killedGood hunting! Toast the motherf**ers.

kbivins said...

I just had to let you know what an impact your blog has had on me. It's not just what you went through, but the skill with which you share it. You obviously weren't the only one there, but most would not be able to convey the intensity and drama of the situation as well as you did.

Thanks so much for all you do. Please know that you are appreciated and please pass these sentiments on to the others that are there with you.

Good Luck!

Heartless Libertarian said...

CB-I don't know what unit you're in, but I was in 5-20 until last summer. Give 'em hell, and watch your back.

And tell CPT Dabkowski in A/5-20, CPT Mason in Bravo, and CPT...Eric...I can't remember his last name, the C/5-20 commander, that CPT Lange at Ft Jackson sends his best and wishes he could be there.

Fix Bayonets!

Archer said...

Tell all your friends over there. We do CARE and we are DAM PROUD!!!

Dharma said...

Dude, I'm proud of you and I don't even know you!
My husband is heading Balad way early next year.....I know he's hoping to get to do what you did.
Thank you, thank you, thank you...and if you're ever in St Louis, the drinks are on me!
Much love,
Dharma

HunterByrd said...

Young man, kudos to you! Your courage and bravery, however unformulated or realized at this stage in your life, is duly noted. I am very proud of you! Regardless of what happens tomorrow, your life is one of accomplishment. You have made your mark. This is true, because you have impacted the lives of many others.

At the risk of being lost in a very large chorus, let me say this: You keep your head up and alert. Do not vacillate in your beliefs.

Be educated. Read this person or that person. Post this or that artist. But reach your own conclusions without delay. Time is of the essence. A leader leads. A leader is always open to new ideas, but his or her focus is always clear.

You have gained a sort of reputation as 'America's soldier' -- it has served you well. But what America needs now is clear vision. You have that vision, but you are content to be nebulous and keep people wondering. You have shown that you are better than that. Take a stand!

God Bless You, brother.

HunterByrd
-from deep within flyover country

NightScope said...

Im a Sgt in 3rd Id 5-7 cav. im now being moved to 4th brg at the toc. i feel your pain. no civy understands what you went through. ive had my hell over there and rearing up to go for the 3rd time. each time i get there i cant get the scared out of me. you made it. you, like the rest of the army, are brothers. only you know what an army of one means. because you make it what u feel. pride. try to e-mail me at Milcoxs@excite.com be safe. gods speed. and always be there for you battels. there be there for you. hoah

Paulie at The Commons said...

Son, that's a good report.

God Speed, and Keep up the fire!

curly said...

thank you so much for all that you are doing.

Toni said...

Hey CB - nothing much I can add that hasn't already been said. But as a civilian I've learned not just from your write up but also from many of the comments posted. Thankyou for your service.

Zoe Brain said...

Reactions, in order:

i) Bloody Hell!

ii) Only the US Army could have such a cluster.... but only the US Army has people with the skills and sheer guts to win regardless. Us armchair Quarterbacks and Theoreticians can say 'you should never have been put in that situation' and certainly say 'you should never have had to go back in', but Murphy always has the last laugh, sometimes you just gotta.

iii) Bugger that for a game of soldiers. Give me a nice, safe, cosy submarine any day. And if you're ever down Canberra way, here in Australia, I'm buying.

iv) (This one's from the heart) Rather you than me. I hope that I'd have the guts to retrieve that spare ammo. I'm not sure I would. I am sure I don't ever want to be in a position to find out.

Oh yes, there's now a link to your site over on The Command Post. Not Instapundit, but you may get one from him soon too.

BTW I'm still shaking from reading it. I've done a bit of work for our DVA (Department of Veterans' Affairs) and it wouldn't be unusual for you to have some PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) out of this. If offered any councilling, take it, whether you need it or not. It helps. Bluntly, guys like you are too valuable to lose to preventable conditions.

strykeraunt said...

Nightscope, A third time!!! As a "civy" I agree that I will never fully understand what any of you have or will go through. I want to understand as much as possible but know that understanding all without being there is impossible. As a family member of two soldiers my heart breaks for you and your family. You are making a sacrifice that nobody else can possibly comprehend. Maybe you will consider starting a blog yourself while you are over there. I for one would be interested in knowing how you are doing. Also, please remember while you are over there and more isolated from American opinion, there are a lot of people who continue to care and support all of you...put the negative crap into perspective.

rjsubsonic said...

i'll see you soon im going to mosul advance party this month.

matt bahr said...

My buddy is the LT that was injured... he's still in Germany, they tried to bring him over to Walter Reid but he crashed again before the flight so they aren't going to bring him back for a couple more days. They took out his spleen, 2 shattered ribs, a few inches of his small intestine, a valve in his chest to fix the collapsed lung, repaired a hole in his colon, sewed up several holes in his diaphram, and put him on two colostomy bags, one for the colon and one for the intestine. He is still on a respirator, but can respond to simple verbal commands. No spinal or head injuries. Prayers and any more info on the engagement would be greatly appreciated.

Cally said...

CB-Good Work with the story. You are showing people, including my family, something i would never be able to explain to them. I think most of us guys over here just want people to know what really happens, and you are doing a wonderful job at that. I read all the comments you recieved and it was a definite morale boost to see that there are actually people supporting us. Keep up the good work. Also, i would like to take this time to apologize to you for that night with the cat. Im getting another one of my famous packages soon, think you can handle it?

Mesdina said...

Hey there, I... feel it isn't shame, it's more regret that I can not be fighting with you. I tried to join the USN when I was eighteen, they wouldn't let me because of diabetes. Even after all that has happened, our militaries current engagements, and a friend of mien who did a tour in Iraq's personal assurances that it's hell on earth and the last place I would want to be, I would still serve and proudly do my duty to protect the freedom that I enjoy, and protect the freedom of others. It would be my greatest honor to fight alongside someone as brave as you and your comrades are. Keep fighting, the media doesn't represent the views of everyone out there. I and many others are damn proud of you.

ibemee said...

You are ALL in our prayers....
I hope you realize that your blog is growing more and more important as more and more of us find it... the managed "news" we get here at home doesn't fool us anymore >:-( We have to find foreign news on the internet, and never know how accurate that is, either - so we rely on blogs like yours! THANKS SO MUCH!! We are outraged about the way they 'hide' the bodies of OUR returning BELOVED dead HEROES... and wonder if maybe a 'reason' for all that secrecy is that they aren't reporting all the casualities. When so much is kept secret from US about OUR sons and daughters, you gotta wonder. Hang in there kids, only about 90 days til the election. May God and ALL the Angels embrace you until you are safely home in our arms again.... XOXOXOXOOXXOXOXOXO

strykeraunt said...

ibema, I am not sure which "we" you are referring to in regards to your comment regarding casualties. If you want to have a list of casualties you can go to the department of defense website (dod.gov). I really don't think there is any conspiracy in regards to casualties because it would be too difficult to pull off. I will not go into my opinion to your statement except to say that I am definitely not one of the "we."

In regards to your 90 days until election comment...I hope you are not going to place your vote based solely on a misconception that your choice will turn around and pull our troops out of Iraq. To put it simply...it just ain't gonna happen. CB will be home long before the decision is made to pull our troops out.

I encourage you to read the other articles and comments on this site. There is really a lot of valuable information here if you are willing to open your mind to the possibilities.

Cannoneer No. 4 said...

http://www.tribnet.com/news/story/5408609p-5344534c.html Stryker Brigade slammed by insurgents

Michael Gilbert has made you famous.

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1188540/posts

Bug Me Not said...

Good job, soldier! Now bring the excitement down and rely on your training. Pick a target, aim, and fire on it carefully. You'll do great.

Mooey said...

It was hard to read your report, but I am grateful that the casualties were few. God bless and keep you all in his loving care. America's prayers are with you always. We are proud of you and thank you for your efforts to keep us at home safe and free. You are not forgotten for even one moment. Stay safe and come home, Ali-Ba-Ba!

kilr0y said...

Ali-babba? I don't know what your talkin' about man, I'm in "Acquisitions".

bucsret said...

Crush those sumbitches. If I could relieve you on the gun mount I would. Hang in there.

BUCS, USN (Ret)

ch said...

kill those motherless bastardos.

Nate said...

just thought i'd let you know that all the guys aound the AO were pulling for you guys in Mosul. Tall Afar is greatful for the punishment you dished out on those bastards that hit our convoy earlier that day.
thanks.

viper0215 said...

I noticed one of the comments on the board was about Lt. Armeni.
My district mangager is Damon's mother-in-law. I receive word from her on a daily basis & just wanted to let everyone know on this site, including the author, that Damon is doing better. He has been moved from ICU down to step down ICU, & has been through 3 surgeries to remove shrapnal & repair injuries. He had to have his spleen removed, a lung repaired, & intestines repaired, among other things, but is doing better. His mom & wife are currently with him in Washington D.C. After reading this account of everything that you guys went through I cannot express my sincere gratitude, in words, for everything that you & your fellow military men & women are doing for us back here in the states. I have another dear friend over there as well, his name is Ken Santee, if you see him tell him hi for me, but above all everyone over there, please be safe.

Neil said...

"I say we take off and just nuke the site from orbit...It's the only way to be sure." - Aliens

Thank God for you guys.

ziggy said...

Geez, I'm sitting here in a puddle of piddle and I'm JUST READING THE THING!

Lord Almighty! I am a lot of the rest of the people who are coming here to read your stuff. It is showing me the things those clowns in the news media are leaving out of our daily doses of what they laughingly call "the news."

We're praying for you guys. Seriously praying.

Stay safe.

crazyness said...

War is hell... Never experience war but that´s how it is.. And 4 you who fights in Iraq I suggest you to leave that place if you want to get out in time and alive. You got lucky that day.. I hope your luck are with U all the time.. You will need it..

//crazyness

Andy said...

I hope Iraq stabilises soon and you all get to return home. If you are in such a firefight again I'm sure you'll be more in control for having survived this one.
Good luck!

ron said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
free0352 said...

Dude, I'm new to ur blog. I've been there...glad yer ok, don't sweat it. Combat sure sucks eh?.... Fuck it!

Jarhead

Maksim said...

Right, on the one side you have state of the art hi-tech soldiers wearing bodyarmor, kevlar helmets, sitting in their tanks behind their .50 Brownings but still scared to death when it gets down and dirty. On the other side you have a bunch of bearded guys wearing only a black T-shirt and black pants to protect their bodys, no armored vehicles, no communication systems, no artillery or helicopter backup, just a jamming AK47 in their hands and a rusty RPG on their back. Looks to me like they must have the better arguments.

sgt tom said...

Best account I've heard,retched into my guts and puckered my assaholla.Now all you no go's that raised a flag on 09/12/01 and then didn't raise your right hand and swear in in front of it get your lame lazy asses down to the recruiter and find out if they think your good enough to serve with this young man and i don't wanna hear no shit about "I just want the college money" Get some HUAA

#10 GI said...

I've just read a story from a young soldiers baptisim in fire.The story may become well known some day.It is a story that has been told many times over by those true hero's of our nation from the revolution to IRAQ that do not claim to be hero's but are .The story is based on true fear in conflict that few will ever experience. It's so powerful that when it's told it needs no exageration .It will bleed on you through the script and stop your breathing and increase your heart rate.This is a taste of the "pucker factor" that only a few true hero's can understand and some can only sample in the story. I wish i could of had a copy to hand to all those who unfurrled their flags on 9/12/01. I wonder how many would have followed me to the recruiter after reading it or put away their flag and gone home. A seasoned marine who heard my own story of my fear in conflict said face it and tell it just as it was,those who hear it will recognize it's truth ,let he who lives it and is not affected cast the first stone but do not throw rocks at yourself . Welcome to the brotherhood ,the object is not to arrive at the grave all pretty and in one piece but to come rolling in tatered,woreout,and used up and in that short fall to the bottom of the grave remember it's been a hell of a ride.

JustCallMeMike said...

Bless you man.. No one tells you that there are a huge bunch back here in our couches and soft beds and cool cars.. that never get to thank you personally. I am doing that right now for the bunch of conservatives here in the midwest. We seem to be surrounded by un-conservatives. (dare I keed politically mute for now). Geeze your account is exactly like I would have pictured. I was drafted into the Army in late '70 and trained with the 3rd. Armored Calv. I was there and even though drafted, swore I would go and do my part, where ever it led. You guys are there with my heart behind ya. I get pized that CNN and so many other news sources just wanna keep the hand ringing and give a tiny picture (thier spin) of the truth. It seems like they can not see that they put you in danger. The story they will tell is you with the 10 second burst shooting a couple of "might not be armed", and not the 30 mortars and our wounds. Now this poor Marine is going to be straped about the deal in Falugia. He diserves a medal and the squeeky rat imbedded cameraman should be hauled back here and fired. Bless you and thanks God was with you in this battle. You are the good.

Followers